Top web Technology of the last decade that changed the internet landscape.

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So we finally entered into a new year, just think back to the 10 year back from now and look around now we’ll see very significant advancement, especially in the areas of the Web platform. The last 10 years were actually a very good time for innovation and progress.
Here is some selection of technologies of the past 10 years that have just brought a remarkable revolution in internet landscape and made the biggest advances in our life.


1. Ajax

The term Ajax was coined on 18 February 2005 by Jesse James Garrett in an article entitled "Ajax: A New Approach to Web Applications. Ajax is  an acronym for Asynchronous JavaScript and XML  is a group of interrelated web development methods used on the client-side to create asynchronous web applications. With Ajax, web applications can send data to, and retrieve data from, a server asynchronously (in the background) without interfering with the display and behavior of the existing page. Data is usually retrieved using the XMLHttpRequest object. Despite the name, the use of XML is not needed (JSON is often used instead), and the requests do not need to be asynchronous.
In the 1990s, most web sites were based on complete HTML pages; each user action required that the page be re-loaded from the server (or a new page loaded). This process is inefficient, as reflected by the user experience: all page content disappears then reappears, etc. Each time a page is reloaded due to a partial change, all of the content must be re-sent instead of only the changed information. This can place additional load on the server and use excessive bandwidth. Asynchronous loading of content first became practical when Java applets were introduced in the first version of the Java language in 1995.


 2. IRC
Internet Relay Chat (IRC) is a protocol for real-time Internet text messaging (chat) or synchronous conferencing. It is mainly designed for group communication in discussion forums, called channels, but also allows one-to-one communication via private message as well as chat and data transfer, including file sharing.
IRC was created by Jarkko Oikarinen in August 1988 to replace a program called MUT (MultiUser Talk) on a BBS called OuluBox in Finland. Oikarinen found inspiration in a chat system known as Bitnet Relay, which operated on the BITNET. IRC was used to report on the 1991 Soviet coup d'├ętat attempt throughout a media blackout. It was previously used in a similar fashion during the Gulf War. Logs of these and other events are kept in the ibiblio archive.

3.Blog



A blog (a blend of the term web log) is a type of website or part of a website supposed to be updated with new content from time to time. Blogs are usually maintained by an individual with regular entries of commentary, descriptions of events, or other material such as graphics or video. Entries are commonly displayed in reverse-chronological order. Blog can also be used as a verb, meaning to maintain or add content to a blog.
The term "weblog" was coined by Jorn Barger on 17 December 1997. The short form, "blog," was coined by Peter Merholz, who jokingly broke the word weblog into the phrase we blog in the sidebar of his blog Peterme.com in April or May 1999.
Blogging is going to be a rising phenomena that will bring information to a far more democratic level than anyone ever believed possible. The governments and the power structure will have to contend with the power of the individual blogger. Bloggers are changing the face of the world by turning the web into aforum - for the people, by the people and of the people.


4.Rss

RSS (originally RDF Site Summary, often dubbed Really Simple Syndication) is a family of web feed formats used to publish frequently updated works—such as blog entries, news headlines, audio, and video—in a standardized format. An RSS document (which is called a "feed", "web feed",or "channel") includes full or summarized text, plus metadata such as publishing dates and authorship.
The RSS formats were preceded by several attempts at web syndication that did not achieve widespread popularity. The basic idea of restructuring information about websites goes back to as early as 1995, when Ramanathan V. Guha and others in Apple Computer's Advanced Technology Group developed the Meta Content Framework. RDF Site Summary, the first version of RSS, was created by Dan Libby and Ramanathan V. Guha at Netscape. It was released in March 1999 for use on the My.Netscape.Com portal. This version became known as RSS 0.9. In July 1999, Dan Libby of Netscape produced a new version, RSS 0.91, which simplified the format by removing RDF elements and incorporating elements from Dave Winer's scriptingNews syndication format. Libby also renamed RSS Rich Site Summary and outlined further development of the format in a "futures document".
This would be Netscape's last participation in RSS development for eight years. As RSS was being embraced by web publishers who wanted their feeds to be used on My.Netscape.Com and other early RSS portals, Netscape dropped RSS support from My.Netscape.Com in April 2001 during new owner AOL's restructuring of the company, also removing documentation and tools that supported the format.


5. HTML5

HTML5 is a language for structuring and presenting content for the World Wide Web, and is a core technology of the Internet originally proposed by Opera Software. It is the fifth revision of the HTML standard (created in 1990 and standardized as HTML4 as of 1997) and as of December 2011 is still under development. Its core aims have been to improve the language with support for the latest multimedia while keeping it easily readable by humans and consistently understood by computers and devices (web browsers, parsers, etc.). HTML5 is intended to subsume not only HTML 4, but XHTML 1 and DOM2HTML (particularly JavaScript) as well.
The Web Hypertext Application Technology Working Group (WHATWG) began work on the new standard in 2004, when the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) was focusing future developments on XHTML 2.0, and HTML 4.01 had not been updated since 2000. In 2009, the W3C allowed the XHTML 2.0 Working Group's charter to expire and decided not to renew it. W3C and WHATWG are currently working together on the development of HTML5.
Even though HTML5 has been well known among web developers for years, it became the topic of mainstream media in April 2010 after Apple Inc's then-CEO Steve Jobs issued a public letter titled "Thoughts on Flash" where he concludes that Adobe "Flash is no longer necessary to watch video or consume any kind of web content" and that "new open standards created in the mobile era, such as HTML5, will win".This sparked a debate in web development circles where some suggested that while HTML5 provides enhanced functionality, developers must consider the varying browser support of the different parts of the standard as well as other functionality differences between HTML5 and Flash. In early November 2011 Adobe announced that it will discontinue development of Flash for mobile devices and reorient its efforts in developing tools utilizing HTML 5.



6. Voip
Voice over IP (VoIP) is a family of technologies, methodologies, communication protocols, and transmission techniques for the delivery of voice communications and multimedia sessions over Internet Protocol (IP) networks, such as the Internet. Other terms frequently encountered and often used synonymously with VoIP are IP telephony, Internet telephony, voice over broadband (VoBB), broadband telephony, and broadband phone. The roots of Internet phone service or VoIp goes back to 1995 when a small telecom company called Vocaltec released its first Internet phone software. The software had been designed for a home Pc and used similar attachments like headsets, microphones, sound cards and speakers. This software called ‘Internet Phone’ used the H.323 protocol instead of the currently prevalent SIP protocol. This software was very well accepted in the market and by 1996 Vocaltec had a successful IPO running. The position that SKYPE occupies in the market was then occupied by Vocaltec. The draw back because of which this software suffered was the non availability of broadband and a resultant poor voice quality owing to modems. The voice quality was worse than the normal phone calls.


7. Semantic Web

The Semantic Web is a collaborative movement led by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) that promotes common formats for data on the World Wide Web. By encouraging the inclusion of semantic content in web pages, the Semantic Web aims at converting the current web of unstructured documents into a "web of data". It builds on the W3C's Resource Description Framework (RDF)
The concept of the Semantic Network Model was coined in the early sixties by the cognitive scientist Allan M. Collins, linguist M. Ross Quillian and psychologist Elizabeth F. Loftus in various publications, as a form to represent semantically structured knowledge. It extends the network of hyperlinked human-readable web pages by inserting machine-readable metadata about pages and how they are related to each other, enabling automated agents to access the Web more intelligently and perform tasks on behalf of users. The term was coined by Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the World Wide Web and director of the World Wide Web Consortium ("W3C"), which oversees the development of proposed Semantic Web standards. He defines the Semantic Web as "a web of data that can be processed directly and indirectly by machines."
Many of the technologies proposed by the W3C already existed before they were positioned under the W3C umbrella. These are used in various contexts, particularly those dealing with information that encompasses a limited and defined domain, and where sharing data is a common necessity, such as scientific research or data exchange among businesses. In addition, other technologies with similar goals have emerged, such as microformats.

8. UGC
User generated content (UGC) covers a range of media content available in a range of modern communications technologies. It entered mainstream usage during 2005 having arisen in web publishing and new media content production circles. Its use for a wide range of applications, including problem processing, news, gossip and research, reflects the expansion of media production through new technologies that are accessible and affordable to the general public. All digital media technologies are included, such as question-answer databases, digital video, blogging, podcasting, forums, review-sites, social networking, mobile phone photography and wikis. In addition to these technologies, user generated content may also employ a combination of open source, free software, and flexible licensing or related agreements to further reduce the barriers to collaboration, skill-building and discovery.



9. Cloud computing
Cloud computing is the delivery of computing as a service rather than a product, whereby shared resources, software, and information are provided to computers and other devices as a metered service over a network (typically the Internet).
Cloud computing is a marketing term for technologies that provide computation, software, data access, and storage services that do not require end-user knowledge of the physical location and configuration of the system that delivers the services. A parallel to this concept can be drawn with the electricity grid, wherein end-users consume power without needing to understand the component devices or infrastructure required to provide the service.
The idea of an "intergalactic computer network" was introduced in thesixties by J.C.R. Licklider, who was responsible for enabling the development of ARPANET (Advanced Research Projects Agency Network) in 1969. His vision was for everyone on the globe to be interconnected and accessing programs and data at any site, from anywhere, explained Margaret Lewis, product marketing director at AMD. "It is a vision that sounds a lot like what we are calling cloud computing."

10.Firebug










It may seem a little strange to include a Firefox extension in this list, but don’t underestimate Firebug’s influence. In 1999, JavaScript and CSS debugging was almost impossible using the tools provided with IE. The rise of Web2.0 applications would have certainly been slower if it were not for Firebug and the many tools that imitate its functionality.

11.Youtube

YouTube was founded by Chad Hurley, Steve Chen, and Jawed Karim, who were all early employees of PayPal. Hurley had studied design at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, while Chen and Karim studied computer science together at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. According to a story that has often been repeated in the media, Hurley and Chen developed the idea for YouTube during the early months of 2005, after they had experienced difficulty sharing videos that had been shot at a dinner party at Chen's apartment in San Francisco. Karim did not attend the party and denied that it had occurred, while Hurley commented that the idea that YouTube was founded after a dinner party "was probably very strengthened by marketing ideas around creating a story that was very digestible".
YouTube offered the public a beta test of the site in May 2005, six months before the official launch in November 2005. The site grew rapidly, and in July 2006 the company announced that more than 65,000 new videos were being uploaded every day, and that the site was receiving 100 million video views per day

12. Quora
Quora is a question-and-answer website created, edited and organized by its community of users. The site was founded in June 2009, launched in private beta in December 2009, and made available to the public on June 21, 2010.
Quora was co-founded by two former Facebook employees, Adam D'Angelo and Charlie Cheever. D'Angelo quit his position at Facebook in January 2010 to create Quora and said he was inspired to create Quora because he thought: "that Q & A is one of those areas on the internet where there are a lot of sites, but no one had come along and built something that was really good yet." Quora's base of users grew quickly in December 2010. Quora had half a million users in January 2011.In June 2011, Quora redesigned its website, in order to make information discovery and navigation easier. Nevertheless some critics said that the redesign was inspired by Wikipedia. Quora released an official iPhone app on September 29, 2011.

13. Facebook

Do we really need to introduce facebook to anyone anymore ? well everyone is already know the magic of facebook that how it changed the whole social structure of the world .
Facebook is a social networking service and website launched in February 2004, operated and privately owned by Facebook, Inc.As of July 2011, Facebook has more than 800 million active users. Users must register before using the site, after which they may create a personal profile, add other users as friends, and exchange messages, including automatic notifications when they update their profile.
Mark Zuckerberg wrote Facemash, the predecessor to Facebook, on October 28, 2003, while attending Harvard as a sophomore. According to The Harvard Crimson, the site was comparable to Hot or Not, and "used photos compiled from the online facebooks of nine houses, placing two next to each other at a time and asking users to choose the 'hotter' person".

14. LAMP
LAMP is an acronym for a solution stack of free, open source software, referring to the first letters of Linux (operating system), Apache HTTP Server, MySQL (database software) and PHP (or sometimes Perl or Python), principal components to build a viable general purpose web server.The GNU project is advocating people to use the term "GLAMP" since what is known as "Linux" is known to GNU as the GNU/Linux system.
The exact combination of software included in a LAMP package may vary, especially with respect to the web scripting software, as PHP may be replaced or supplemented by Perl and/or Python. Similar terms exist for essentially the same software suite (AMP) running on other operating systems, such as Microsoft Windows (WAMP), Mac OS (MAMP), Solaris (SAMP), iSeries (iAMP), or OpenBSD (OAMP).

15. Twitter

Twitter is an online social networking service and microblogging service that enables its users to send and read text-based posts of up to 140 characters, known as "tweets". It was created in March 2006 by Jack Dorsey and launched that July. The service rapidly gained worldwide popularity, with over 300 million users as of 2011, generating over 300 million tweets and handling over 1.6 billion search queries per day.
The Internet revolutionized how business was done and how a company marketed to its consumers. One of the most interesting aspects of Twitter is that it has develop its own niche in the social media world. Facebook has many more users, but Twitter is easier to use and allows a business to connect with its customers in a more casual way. Twitter has developed into a mini-Google for consumers and allows for more targeted marketing for a business.




16. Peer-to Peer
Peer-to-Peer (P2P) technology is a distributed network architecture that allows data to be spread from computer to computer without a central node. One of the major advantages of this type of setup is that as more people log on and use the network, they add their resources (like bandwidth), so the network scales automatically as demand increases — meaning that the more people using a P2P network, the faster it generally becomes.
The idea rose to mainstream prominence in 1999 with the launch of Napster, a P2P software product that allowed people to trade MP3 music files with one another. Though the service was eventually litigated out of business by the music industry, it arguably changed the way music — and later movies and other types of media — are distributed, and paved the way for the success of MP3 players like the iPod and legitimate online music stores like iTunes. Indeed, it can be argued that without P2P networks making the idea of trading MP3 files and movies over the Internet commonplace, legitimate services that allow us to do things like stream multimedia content and store entire music libraries on our cell phones might have never been made.
Today, P2P traffic accounts for anywhere from 27-55 percent of all Internet traffic (depending on location), and popular peer-to-peer protocols, such as BitTorrent, continue to influence everything from music and film distribution to network architecture and Internet legislation.

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TechFond - Latest Technology News & Analysis | Innovation | Startups | Reviews: Top web Technology of the last decade that changed the internet landscape.
Top web Technology of the last decade that changed the internet landscape.
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